King King plus Broken Witt Rebels The Queen's Hall Edinburgh Review 25th November 2016

HOMEPAGE PAST REVIEWS 2016 PAST REVIEWS 2015

King King at the Queen’s Hall in Edinburgh with support band Broken Witt Rebels was a show that I have been waiting for some time for.  Having heard so much from other people and read so much online about King King, I wanted to see and hear for myself if this multi award winning Rock and Blues band (5 major awards at British Blues Awards 2016) from Glasgow lived up to the praise currently being given to them.  Also, I had just had the opportunity a week or so ago to review their first live album “King King Live” and also wondered if the band could reproduce any of the sound and feeling of that album here in Edinburgh tonight.  Two big questions, then for me, and both answered with a big YES.


King King the band are Alan Nimmo (vocals/guitar), Bob Fridzema (keys), Lindsay Coulson (bass), and Wayne Proctor (drums).  Four very different musicians, but when playing together, one solid and tight sound that is both classic but at the same time unique enough to be an identifiable sound amongst the many other bands out there at the moment.  A large part of that unique sound is down to Alan Nimmo’s vocals range and guitar skills, and Bob Fridzema playing that wonderful vintage Hammond organ.  Nothing out there sounds like a real Hammond organ, and even the best attempts to synthesize it on modern electronic keyboards have failed.


King King may have a great sound, but that is only part of the equation.  Being able to play good rock and blues guitar or keyboards are in the end only technical abilities that are limited if the songs are not strong and identifiable.  King King have both the sound and the songs, as this set proved.  There are songs here that the crowd really have taken to their hearts like “Rush Hour”, and classic soul sounds (that Hammond organ really comes into its own on these) on songs like “A Long History of Love”.  Great too to hear the band paying tribute to their own musical heroes and inspiration with Frankie Miller’s “Jealousy”...and of course the new single “Waking Up”.


Just as important as the music and the songs though is that indefinable quality that King King seem to have with their audience.  This is a band that the fans really have taken into their hearts, and that connection between band and audience was obvious all night.


Our review of the new album “King King Kive” is available at
http://www.southsideadvertiser.biz./King-King-Live-Album-Review-November-2016.htm


For more information on King King visit
http://www.kingking.co.uk/Home.html

Opening the show here, Birmingham based band “Broken Witt Rebels” - Danny Core (Vocals & Rhythm guitar),  Luke Davis  (Vocals & Bass),  James Tranter (Vocals & Lead Guitar)  and  James Dudley  (Drums & Percussion).  Supporting King King must be a bit of a dream job for the band as not only are they playing the rock, blues and soul sounds that King King’s fans will appreciate, but they are also getting to learn on the job from a more experienced band.


Danny Core has a good and powerful blues/soul voice but maybe just needs to realise that his natural talent does not have to be pushed so hard on every song – sometimes just stepping back off the “power pedal” can take a singer and an audience into a more emotional space.  He has a solid and tight band on stage with him, and they are more than good enough to follow him wherever that voice wants to go.


Broken Witt Rebels have the sound, and with songs like “Guns” and “Georgia Pine” the writing abilities to take them easily to the next stage in their careers.


For more information on the band visit
http://www.brokenwittrebels.com/

 

Review by Tom King

 

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